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. >> but they are more -- their goal is to educate the public on a issue that impacts the environment, not lining their pocketbooks. neil: all right. >> their goal is to influence legislation, that is the point. neil: if you can agree on outlawing yoko ono concerts we might be off to the races, but thank you. this just in, that thing on your plate is still a biscuit. but it is not "seabiscuit." think this horse meat threat went too far. during sequestration, meet the restaurant ceo who said it damn near cost him business before and after sequestration. (announcer) scottrade knows our clients trade and invest their own way. with scottrade's smart text, i can quickly understand my charts, and spend more time trading. their quick trade bar lets my account follow me online so i can react in real-time. plus, my local scottrade office is there to help. because they know i don't trade like everybody. i trade like me. i'm with scottrade. (announcer) scottrade. voted "best investment services company." it's delicious. so now we've turned her toffee into a business. my goal was to take an idea and make it
, of course, is so sensitive to what goes on in the environment. as soon as i read this, and i saw that it trechs from santa barbara to san fransisco, i thought, well, there you go. these are two of the most environmentally sensitive places on the planet. i just don't see how the signs of the economic benefit are worth what would be dangerous to the environment. >> well, let me say a couple things to that, melissa. first, we agree absolutely the environment has to be protected. that's issue number one. any energy source that does grave damage to the environment should not be pursued, and so there needs to be objective analysis of the implications, but there needs to be objective analysis of the economic implications. you can't balance cost and benefits unless you know -- melissa: you look at things like the xl pipelines, there's no objective analysis satisfying unless it's destroying the environment. they are an enemy of shale, fracking, enemy of oil of the there's no report -- if the report came out and said that it wouldn't cause damage, environmentalists wouldn't accept that. ho
. >> hank, you own bank stocks. are you not worried about this? >> no. in fact, in a rising rate environment, as long as rates don't spike up dramatically overnight, in a rising rate environment, banks are going to make more money. >> no, they're not. >> and become even stronger and healthier. and we own two of the highest quality banks in the world, jpmorgan and wells fargo. >> their customers can't -- the borrowers can't afford to pay the higher rates. what's going to happen to the value of the existing collateral when interest rates spike? eventually they're going to spike. the fed has waited far too long to raise them. when they rise they'll rise faster and higher than anyone believes. >> bob pisani, we're not really seeing the impact -- go ahead, jason. >> sure. injury. i'll add in here. i don't fully agree with what your guest is saying here as far as immediately rising rates and banks falling apart. having said that, i think the world has changed and we have to recognize the big picture here. number one, bank business models are not the same they used to be. they're not the great inve
of access to the humanities that urban environments provide, we have a better shot at than, say, other places where large distances have to be traversed in most american cities to kind of get to the places you want to get. here in san francisco, we have been blessed by the geometry where our trips are short where 40 years ago we realized that this was the way we will have to kind of meet our future. the iron call part of that is at the same time europe also discovered that and they made strides to towards actually implementing these alternative choices, we have found it very difficult to kind of wean ourselves from the convenience of being able to. i say it is still convenient to drive. as long as the alternatives are not just as convenient, we won't be able to make our case about our travel modes as contribution to the detriment of the environment or to the detriment of our health as we all know the sun is by date getting madder at us and angle grier at us and we are getting fat. we got to do something about it. this is the time to do it. we have the best opportunity here with these f
the environment and the puc is going to show everyone else, you can do this, too. and you can do it in a way that makes sense, that's affordable, and that is better for the environment. >> and this is the most energy efficient government building in the united states today, if not the world. and it is an example that the entire united states can look to and say, that's what we need to do to save our city hundreds of millions of dollars in energy consumption a year and set an example to everybody of how to save energy, to be green, to be sustainable, to be responsible. the city is leading the way. >> it will be immediately recognizable and iconic from various parts of the city or even if you see a picture. that's the sfpuc building. it's a wonderful building. ♪ ♪ >>> while i get myself settled, maybe a show of hands. how many already been to see the exhibition? a number of you. first of all let me say good afternoon and first and foremost i would like to thank my colleagues in the education department in the fine arts museum of san francisco for an allowing me to speak today. valuable a
earnings cycle. also in this environment the u.s. economy is growing more like 2% and a lot less like 4 in that environment pricing is going to be challenged and the top line sales is not going to be universal for all firms. it will be balance sheet by balance sheet and case by case. security collection becomes far more important. >> i was going to say as you point out the profit growth picture has been pretty good but we are getting at the mature point in that cycle and the forecast is about 1% or 2% overall growth. there are always ways to make more money than the index tracking would lead you to believe. where do you think the pockets of possible better than average profits would be? >> so we do like equities. when you compare that to fixed income certainly in government space so we like equities and we like global equities. it will have to be a multi asset strategy which is kind of all of the above. looking at commodities and debt and equities and looking in companies in europe. there are good companies with strong balance sheets in europe, as well. looking into russia, indonesia, m
environment for the fed reserve to stay stock market friendly. that's exactly what happened today. ben bernanke allowed the averages to power higher. dow gained 56 points. the s&p rising today, nasdaq jumping .78%. it's not sleight of hand or alchemy at work here, despite what critics say when they constantly slam the fed. >> boo! >> bernanke is not playing a game of move the stock market higher by simply continuing to keep the competition from bonds incredibly weak. he's got a real good reason for doing what he's doing, which is staying the course, keeping rates low. that reason? 1937. see, ben bernanke is a rigorous guy. he's a professor and a genuine scholar of american financial history. it's what he does best. he knows that in 1937 after three years of 12% economic growth that took unemployment from 25% down to 14%, the fed, the president, congress, declared victory over the great depression. ♪ hallelujah >> washington raised income taxes on the wealthy. >> boo! >> took the top marginal rate to the astounding 75% and instituted a 2% payroll tax for social security. their goal? t
-on/risk-off environment that we have to be cautious. yes, there's room to grows and investors have totally forgotten about europe since last summer. don't be surprised if it comes back later on this year. and quite heavily. >> how does it come back, though? is it the banking sector? specifically, let's talk about actual impacts to the u.s. market. >> well, the impact has a lot to do with the concern of where we're going, the kind of money we're spending and the kind of debt we have. you know, we're not too far behind europe. and obviously, we're a long way away from greece, but when you look at germany and france and some other companies, it's still a very dangerous environment. they still have a very low to negative growth rate. we're still looking at positive. you know, we had some good response from the housing market earlier today, but we still need to be very, very cautious. yes, there's room to grow. prices of stocks are not overvalued by no means. but we still need to be very cautious of where we're going in terms of debt and the economy. >> all right. so we're vulnerable in that regard. let's talk
have suffered. it's a low-interest environment, which makes stocks the only liquid investment game in town and that explains the market we're in. joining me is the the chief economist at rbs securities and ned riley, the ceo. i have laid out why the fed has fuld the rally. when you buy a stock, you're buying a share of its earnings. the price to earnings ratio used to figure out the value of a stock is still low. let's take a look here. i want to show our viewers. the s&p 500 is seeing average earnings of 15. that's the bottom bar. that's half of where they were. lower than where they were five years ago when the dow was trading at about where they are now. that makes me think this isn't just the federal reserve. what do you think? >> it isn't. as a matter of fact, the fear that's in people's hearts right at the moment, it reminds me of rodney dangerfield. the market has no respect. nobody has respect for this market that it is real. clearly we're seeing the public and institutions, i might point out, have been lowering their equity exposure. the the public only has 30% in ek equit
through their dress and environments. like many photographs taken today 17th century portraits were taken from weddings. from 1625 him and his wife are exceptional examples of large scale marriage portraits. other typical occasions for commissioning
, and we need to really realize that we are still in a very slow growth environment. >> well, robert, let me ask you about earnings and whether or not we are going to see an upset once we start getting the numbers for the first quarter. the s&p capital iq is expecting earnings growth for the s&p 500 of 0.6%, no great shakes, that's for sure. >> i agree with that maria. and i think this has really become a position in the market, where we have had a great run. so you don't necessarily go out there with the broad-based index. you have to look at selective stories to invest your money in right now. the transports, first and foremost to us, were looking a little bit overvalued anyway. but if you break the transports down and you look at a company like csx or a norfolk southern, for example, those companies have continued to hit highs this week, and that's based off of valuation. fedex was a company, in my opinion, that was priced for perfection, they came out and reported lousy earnings and that doesn't surprise me. i think u.p.s. is a much better company. they didn't get hurt nearly as bad.
. capitalism is predicated on unlimited growth, but we live in a finite environment and we seem to have a dysfunctional democracy unable to resolve that contradiction. how do you see climate change and our diminishing natural resources such as fossil fuels and water impacting this crisis in capitalism? >> capitalism is a system geared up to doing three things on the part of business: get more profits, grow your company and get a larger market share. those are the driving bottom line issues. corporations are successful or not if they succeed in getting these objectives met. that's what their boards of directors are chosen to do, that's what their shareholders expect. that's the way the system works. if along the way they have to sacrifice either the well-being of their workers or the well-being of the planet or the environmental conditions, they may feel very bad about it, and i know plenty of them who do. but they have no choice. and they will explain if they're honest that that's the way this system works. so we have despoiled our environment in a classic way. that's why we have huge c
if there is a national ban it could create an environment of dollars of for hatred. and last year moscow band came -- gay pride parades in the street for 100 years. with up to a fine of $16,000. >> propaganda can harm the health and moral and spiritual development. it can give young people equality between traditional and non-traditional relations. >> there is no legal definition of what constitutes propaganda for homosexuality. activists say that this could be with a louder version. they cannot put off improving. [inaudible] >> the bill will need to be voted on two more times before it is signed into law, but it is not likely to fail. tois part of a wider drive .ush what he considers >> the death of an exiled russian businessman, one of vladimir putin's fiercest critics. so far police said that his death is unexplained. >> exiled since settling in britain, having written on the waves and opposed the soviet era capitalism, he was once considered one of russia's richest men. he made his money in part by importing cars in the 1990's. for more than one decade he had been one of the loudest opposition voices
and the environment. we can do these projects, prevents these projects will stop a lot of jobs from being created, it is not going to make a development in global emissions. it making no sense to me and the economy. neil: malia. >> i just quickly top say, i understand how we like to take things and combine themm but, i do not think that the only reason why keystone project is not happening is because, barack obama asked his agency this question, to get back to original topic, what i think is really important for us to look forward and you know neil, i don't think that anyone would disagree with you that jobs are important, the problem with laser beam focus you have a society and a lot of things that need to be focused on, laser beaming becomes narrowing, i don't think that is how we' our president or anyone in congress to just have like this one bullet silver bullet solution on what will save the u.s., that is not only thing that u.s. nee right now, we not only have a jobs problem. neil: i think it should be your highest priority. >> it is important for us to look -- >> okay, i understand. >> i d
's a real big play. i'd love to know how citi holdings is doing in this rising environment. >> there's a lot to like. i like citi here and there you have the opening bell here. visa celebrating five years of trading on the nyse and at the nasdaq, the academy of nutrition and dietetics celebrating national nutrition month. >> by the way, speaking of banks and refinancing, the american consumer continues to refinance their household debt either through a refi of their actual home or taking out another credit card with a zero balance or low-balance offer and transferring the balance. visa was a $69 stock two years ago and it's opening today at about $159, right? >> look at that gain. in a market where people are still weak and we still have a tough consumer. >> remember, big international play. >> yes. much more so than ma. >> and it's just a very well-run company. >> a lot of american guys who have been good and have also been run by a foreign individual, and i don't mean to be phonetic, but this is a big worldwide company. >> i changed banks recently because my bank ceased banking so i got a
environment. >> you have to think about this. it's a process. it's physical therapy that now the patient is ready to talk again. >> it's sedation. the patient needs to be told they're going to get better. >> if i buy your argument, david, there's an inflection point that low interest rates are stimulus to a point and then it goes the other way. don't i only have to look to ecb for prove that's not right which kept its rate at 1%? >> there's so much else going on suppressing the economy. >> it's europe. >> i don't think we can -- >> they have a few labor issues, don't they, steve? a few structural problems. >> the analog is ecb did not go all of the way down. it maintained. >> it's europe. >> i don't think that borrowers or lenders really care whether the rate is 1% or half a percent. i don't think it makes any difference at all. the issue for people planning to buy a house or planning to expand a business is how the economy will do. part of the federal reserve's message that we'll see today that's crucial to the statement today, are they going to downplay the economy and talk about outsi
grew up in many an environment -- in an environment where we did tend to look to the west for support or help, but i have a lot of friends who grew up on the other side of the divide who don't see the u.s. the way my friends or my family do. but inevitably, america's a superpower, and it comes with sharp elbows sometimes and big motorcades and big fortresses as embassies. and that can be a bit grating on the local population. so it was really interesting or perhaps, um, revealing for me to be on the other side all of a sudden. it's just a totally different prism through which to look at the issue, to look at the eshoo, the to look at my own country. and i arrived, you know, i'm in the convoy, and i'm sitting there in the convoy and just a few cars ahead of me is another car in that same motorcade surrounded by security escort. this is the secretary of state, and there is jeffrey feldman, um, who is now assistant secretary of state at the state department who used to be ambassador to beirut, and it was his convoy that used to annoy people in beirut, that used to annoy me when i was stu
shifting the inefficient model of growth. i said it's no good to be poor in a beautiful environment, but nor is it good to be well off but live with the consequences of environmental degradation. we need to develop a new thinking on development, and pursue that the element in a scientific way. first, we shouldn't incur any new problems, and we need to raise environmental threshold. second, we need to speed up efforts to overcome long-standing problems, which include phasing out backward production facilities. we will face the situation and punish the offenders without mercy, and enforce the law with an iron fist. [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] >> translator: we shouldn't pursue economic growth at the expense of the environment. such growth will set by the people. it's very important that the extent of pollution, the real food safety situation, and the efforts of our cleanup, results our cleanup efforts must be made public so that the people and media organizations can supervise the government's efforts to more fully and more effectively. this will also in a
opportunities to do some stock picking in this environment and that's really what people need to be doing prp. >> so you're going to want to buy what jim lacamp's selling, is that the idea? >> as long as there are proven fundamentals and an attractive valuation argument. >> all right. rick santelli -- >> now, wait a minute. the fundamentals aren't improving that much. we're seeing earnings start to deteriorate. and fedex and caterpillar, their earnings started to deteriorate. we're seeing some of those if you want fundamentals sl s slac. >> you can't just go blindly by, you know, equities across the board. but there are opportunities to find pockets of the economy that are growing, despite all the negative and worries out there, as far as the macro environment. >> okay. but what about the fact that, you know, we were talking about this yesterday, bill, the s&p is expecting earnings growth, the s&p 500, of 0.7% for the first quarter. so we are looking at an earnings deterioration here. now, they're expecting things to pick up later on in the year. but if you're saying there is growth in the ec
of people worried about the impact fracking has on the environment. this is a possible solution, i guess, yes? >> it is, exactly. i help lead an investment group and funded some brilliant scientists down in florida actually a few years ago. our technology uses no chemicals. we actually in the past since 2008, we've cleaned over 2.8 billion gallons of water, which has eliminated 1.3 million gallons of chemicals. we allow these companies to, first of all, clean the water before they use it the first time, and then also recycle it and reuse it in their process. so we're closing the loop for these responsible companies. >> what about, drew, the government standards? i mean, hasn't this been one of the big detriments for moving forward? how have the standards changed? >> you know, it has been. and they're pushing for more transparency, regarding what chemicals are used, but where we come in, we eliminate those chemicals almost entirely. we allow these companies, we have technology that allows these technologies in realtime to clean their water, recycle it, and reuse the water. so we're elimin
environment. of course he's got a good record on inflation. he got lucky as it per takes to inflation because we had deleveraging. >> andy bush, the best part of jim is he's going to give you all these reasons, what does he call them, doppelganger reasons. when you have lecamp on the show it's not what he says it's what he's doing. he's like a federal government official. not watch what he says but what he's doing. that's why i love the guy. look at him he can't stop smiling. neither can you. you're both great. thank you so much. now folks, a busy day and night on capitol hill. the senate is busy voting on amendment after amendment in their budget bill. we got two distinguished senators about to join us give us their take and later on the show why can't police departments get any ammunition while the department of homeland security has bought up 1.6 billion rounds in the past year. there's no ammo for handdowns, shot guns, rifles, for training. what's up with this or is the dhs in a form of gun control that the congress can't legislate? folks don't forget free market capitalism is the best pa
flying about 70 satellites. so we're pretty familiar with the space environment and the risks it entails. as a global fleet operator serving both commercial and government customers, reliability and continuity of service are our highest priorities. whether it's uav operations over afghanistan or the final game of the ncaa tournament or financial statements that have to be transferred securely around the world, um, we know that our customers expect flawless performance. to deliver this level of performance, we have to daily deal with a range of threats. probably a highest priority for us today is radio frequency interference. many times it's accidental, sometimes intentional. space debris and other challenges of space flight, cyber attacks, solar weather, space systems reliability, the fact that we today don't have an affordable technical solution for refueling and repairing satellites on orbit and last but not least, an international launch industry that's far from robust. now, our economy depends on the ability to create and instantly distribute vast amounts of data around the planet. s
choices. we're doing burgers in a different way in a new fast casual cooked environment. >> how much of a challenge is it when you come over here when horse meat is big in the news. >> food supply is really important. it's something we all have to face. we're using certified angus meat in the united states and we'll be using that here in europe and it's something we'll do a good job of keeping our eyes on. >> what do you think is smashburger's edge? we've been winning great food awards around the world. we tapped into this fast casual business model where you walk up and order and we bring the food to your table for you with a real nice fork and plate and offer $8 to $10 equivalent in the u.s. >> it's a higher price point, a different customer and hopefully better margins. what are your profit margins like and where do you want to see them go? >> we focus on getting the business of burgers right. our margins are approaching 20% which is really leading in the restaurant industry. we're doing well north of a million dollars out of our restaurants and we're doing it for less than half a
the environment, the weak and the poor in today's installation mass at the vatican. seep your foreign affairs correspondent amy kellogg has highlights from rome. >> did a couple of laps at st. peter's square and got out with a disabled man in with crowd of 200,000 people. then there was a homily. >> let us never forget, that authentic power is service. and that the pope when exercising power also must enter ever more boldly in that service, which has the raidient culmination on the cross. >> the feast day of st. joseph, the new pope hit hard on the scene, protecting and looking after others. >> i think the pope saying also tenderness is not weakness, which is great. meaning saying it's good to have a heart. it's not weakness on your part to care about those two are left out, who are sick. lonely. who are poor. >> earlier pope francis took possession of his new fisherman's ring, symbol of st. peter or the stole made of sheep's wool, recalling the good shepherd with the flock on his shoulders. member of the u.s. congressional delegation feels confident there will be active interfaith outreach u
've got to think of leadership right away. the owner's leadership job is to make the environment possible for success for his employees. in other words, if he is making goals or making objectives, he or she has really got to make sure they have the tools and the training to make those goals achievable. the other thing that is important in this is that processes operate the business, and it's the people who operate the processes. and why that is important is because over time - six months, a year - the market changes, your customer demands change, your business changes; and you have to have processes and procedures that keep up with that change, so they have to be constantly updated, worked on, and reviewed. > another key point you talk about is keeping the motivation level high for your employees. let's talk about some of the external things that you're talking about. > > i think the external side really comes down to product and marketing. the first thing, you are your product, and you have to make sure that not only is it attractive and priced competitively, it is exactly what the custo
their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> cloudy to mostly cloudy. still some light rain. temperatures in the 50s. if we can get a few sunbreaks, it could feel muggy. it looks like this afternoon rain will be ending. >>> the top u.s. military commander in europe says several nato countries are working on contingency plans for possible military action to end the two-year civil war in syria. but the commander says a resolution from the u.n. security council and agreement among nato's 28 members will be required before taking a military role in syria. the commander tells us the senate committee that he believes providing military assistance to the opposition would be helpful in bringing an end to the war. syria's main opposition group is demanding a full investigation into an alleged chemical weapons attack by president assad's forces. >>> happening right now, president obama is on his first visit to israel since takin
energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> >>> welcome back to "the kudlow report." i'm larry kudlow. stocks may have dropped today but we've still got even more good news on the economy. now does that mean bern bernanke is going take his foot off the gas pedal sooner rather than later? that might be what's rather bothering stock investors. and where is the new jack kemp now that we need him? a republican who related to everyone with an optimistic but simple message of economic growth for all, we will ask lar larry sabateau in just a few minutes. >> a tax is a tax is a tax. if you tax something more, you get less of it. piling on new taxes is always bad for economic growth period. and yet out of washington comes yet another proposal for another tax. this one known as the marketplace fairness act but it is just a national internet sales tax. could even hit yo
and local authorities that meet globally every year and the networking cities around work and environment, transportation, immigration, security, and a number of other issues. i hadn't heard of it two years ago. i doubt too many people other than that the urban specialists in the room have heard of it. but it is a living organization. most people would say i know what you mean the american conference of mayors, sister cities, maybe. but they pale in the context of the actual inner city organizations literally hundreds of them. some regional, some of national, some with global scope that exist. the forty cities working on forty or fifty eight cities working on global environment doing a better job. mayors running the world. city protocol and new organization, barcelona that shares best practicing clare, the counsel of local authority, the climate alliance. achievings in the nations states are lock up. unable to make any real progress. they are actually doing things important things together, and they do it because when you look at cities, the approach to govern mans, the approach to citize
marriage fidelity. trouble is, it's not going to happen in the current political environment. we're having a situation in which, as the debate over the sequester unfolded, you had republicans saying, this is terrible. it's going to open us up and it's serving iranians, but not a penny of tax increases. no way. in that political environment, it's an unrealistic thing to expect any kind of grand bargain and we don't want to hold short-term economic policies hostage to having this grand bargain that i'd love to see but isn't going to happen right now. >> let me ask you about the last graphic about japan. japan looms large and you spend a lot of time working on it. you came to my attention first when you wrote a book about the, you know, japan-style depression economics and the age of diminished expectations. >> no, japan was the full-scale dress rehearsal for what we're going through now. japan is, people who were studying japan in the 1990s are the ones who are dreading what actually happens. >> when you look at japan. one thing you say, you're glad that the fed, the japanese central bankers
world peace and marriage equality. the trouble is it is not going to happen in the current environment. we have a debate as the sequester unfolded you have republicans saying this is terrible. it will open us up. it is serving iranians but not a penny tax increase. but in that environment it is unrealistic thing to expect a grand bargain and we don't want to hold short term policies hostage to have a grand bargain i'd love to see but isn't going to happen right now. >> this last graph is about japan. you brought it to my attention. you wrote a book at about the japan economics and the -- >> that's right. >> japan is the full-scale dress rehearsal for what we are going through now. people studying japan in the '90s were dreading what happened. >> if you look at japan, one thing you say is when you look at japan now you are glad the japanese central bank is finally doing something. you often argue that japan didn't do enough in terms of stimulus. i want to show you japan's debt to gdp. i guess if this isn't enough, than what is? look at what they spent, it paved every roadway and highway
, very threatening environment, it's very black out here, very dark. bill: a child escaping a crash, but finding herself in new danger when she's forced to find help in the dead of night. heather: and the future of the republican party, karl rove weighing in, why he is saying, don't give up just yet. bill: 10:30 in new york. karl rove over the weekend arguing that the republican party isn't over just yet, shooting down any suggestion that the party is past its praoeup. >> let's be clear, before we assign the republican party to the dust bin of history, 30 out of 50 governors in the united states are republicans. republicans have elected in 2010 the largest number of state legislators since 1920. the majority of state legislators are republicans. we have two robust parties, each with their own problems. the republican party has its problems, the democratic party has its problems and we are likely to see a competitive, political environment for decades to come. bill: i want to talk about this with former arizona senator jon kyl, a fox news contributor. welcome back here. >> thanks, go
of trading. keep that in mind. it's a fabulous environment. last week's other four ipos were up 14% to 20% on the first day. all the tech names work so well. that's why i wanted to introduce you to a new company. it's called pinnacle foods. it's a house of food brands. some say b&g expecting to become public on thursday. pinnacle is a company you never heard of, i bet. but your products can be found in 85% of american house holds. you would recognize their brands. they've got a big frozen food business with bird's eye frozen vegetables, mrs. paul's seafood, lender's bagels, celeste pizza, as well as hungry man frozen meals which i thought looked like a delicious heart attack in a box. and pinnacle has a grocery business. you know them as duncan hines, cookie and cake miss, mrs. butterworth, log cabin, comstock pie filling. as we know from hines from its all-time high last month, iconic brands are the landmark. blackstone is ringing the register on its investment taking the company public. recent history suggests these deals are performing extremely well. case in point, since the beginning
. ♪ ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ ♪ >>> cloudy to mostly cloudy. still some light rain. temperatures in the 50s. if we can get a few sunbreaks, it could feel muggy. it looks like this afternoon rain will be ending. >>> the top u.s. military commander in europe says several nato countries are working on contingency plans for possible military action to end the two-year civil war in syria. but the commander says a resolution from the u.n. security council and agreement among nato's 28 members will be required before taking a military role in syria. the commander tells us the senate committee that he believes providing military assistance to the opposition would be helpful in bringing an end to the war. syria's main opposition group is demanding a full investigation into an alleged chemical weapons
exceptionally clear, natural sound in quiet and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's advanced technology, call 1-800-414-5999 or visit trylyric.com for a risk-free 30 day trial offer and free dvd and brochure. get the hearing aid that can. lyric from phonak. lyric can. ...and we inspected his brakes for free. -free is good. -free is very good. [ male announcer ] now get 50% off brake pads and shoes at meineke. >>> welcome back everyone. here are the stories making news around the world right now. >> in guantanamo bay, cuba, more prisoners have joined a hunger strike at the u.s. detention facility there. a pentagon spokesperson says 24 suspects terrorists are now involved. and eight of them require feeding tubes. >> an attorney for some of the detainees says he was alarmed to see several had lost more than 20 or 30 pounds. he says they're protesting searches of their personal items, letters, photographs, that sort of thing, and also he says the rough handling of qurans during searches. an
creation," pope benedict xvi called upon the faithful, and i quote -- "to protect the environment and to safeguard natural resources and the climate, while at the same time taking into due account the solidarity we owe to those living in the poorer areas of our world and to future generations." in his inaugural mass this morning, pope francis said, and i quote -- "please, i would like to ask all those who have positions of responsibility in economic, political and social life and all men and women of goodwill, let us be protectors of creation, protectors of god's plannen scribed in nature -- plan inscribed in nature, protectors of one another and of the environment. as early news reports indicated, the new pope chose his papal name, francis, out of respect for st. francis' sense of obligation to god's creation, and he noted in one of his very earliest comments that our relationship with god's creation is not so good right now. and of course, the pope is not the only one. ecumenical patriot remark bartholomew 1 of constantinople, the spiritual leader of orthodox christians, urges u
healthy, but i did it. and i noticed him talking again and again about the environment. and how proud she was of his achievement in cleaning up the aerts and of the water. he said it and he was proud of it publicly, and yet on the tapes you have him grousing about it not once or twice, but constantly, identify and environmentalism with liberals saying that we have made a mistake. we shouldn't do this. and if i ever have a choice between jobs and the environment, i always go with jobs. don't ever forget it and fire people that say they should go for the environment. it is so hard to understand. on the one side but he said publicly in the state of the union address, not once but three times that i listened to, what you would want and you actually expect bill clinton it's not president obama to say. but privately he is grousing. do you see in the 50's a man that is at war with himself over what he believes? >> i can see that. one of the most interesting things following this thread of mixing and civil rights, i mentioned the trip to africa and 67, and that's where we met martin luther king,
will be a long-term problem. ashley: as long as this goes on, doug, we talk about the goldilocks environment but it is exactly what it is. it is not too hot to prompt the fed to pull back on its qe. but it is not too cold to push the economy into a recession. so kind of of in this same environment. how long do you think this could last? >> i don't buy the goldilocks analogy because we are in a low to zero growth. fourth quarter gdp in the u.s. is still zero. corporate profits in the third quarter were negative. we're slightly positive now. but first quarter consensus is negative again. where is goldilocks? only the fed stimulus, the fed is protecting a really tight monetary stance by u.s. congress, raising taxes, and, no, i don't see goldilocks at all. tracy: goldilocks is arguably uncle ben, right? he is not going anywhere anytime soon, right? i could make a argument, sell in may, do away thing doesn't count this year. >> i agree with that one, uncle ben. i hadn't heard that before. ultimately it i is pushing on a string. you need to have private economy, you need u.s. corporations, you nee
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